All people are capable of many good and beautiful things

The religious right understand themselves to be in an epic battle against what they call “humanism,” that liberals have too positive a view of human nature. I don’t think the Bible requires us to adopt a nihilistic, anti-humanist view of human nature. Sin is very real and very imprisoning to humanity. And yet, people are capable of many good and beautiful things, even people who have never “accepted Jesus as their personal Lord and savior.” — Morgan Guyton

Morgan Guyton is director of the NOLA Wesley Foundation, which is the United Methodist campus ministry at Tulane and Loyola University in New Orleans, LA. He is also a United Methodist pastor, blogger, and author of dozens of articles featured in Red Letter Christians, Huffington Post Religion, Think Christian, Ministry Matters, and others.

Source: If Donald Trump wins, I will blame toxic Christianity and here’s why

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Racism, white supremacy are ‘a Christian problem’ 

“We need to be much more vocal and proactive in speaking out against racism in all its forms — individual and structural. If we can’t do that, we’re going to be irrelevant as a church.” – Floerke Scheid

Source: Christian ethicists: Racism, white supremacy are ‘a Christian problem’ | National Catholic Reporter

Anna Floerke Scheid is associate professor of theology at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh. Her research interests are in the area of Christian social ethics.  In particular she is concerned with ethical issues surrounding human rights, conflict, and post-conflict reconciliation.  She explores Christian perspectives on war and peace-especially just war theory and just peacemaking theory-and studies how restorative justice has been enacted in truth and reconciliation commissions around the world.

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Greg Gianforte is what toxic Christianity looks like

“The ugliness of toxic Christianity is being laid bare for the whole world to see.” — Morgan Guyton

Greg Gianforte is a right-wing fundamentalist Christian who funded the creationist Dinosaur and Fossil Museum and is on the board of the Association of Classical and Christian Schools.

Morgan Guyton is the director of the NOLA Wesley Foundation, the United Methodist campus ministry at Tulane and Loyola University in New Orleans, LA.

See: Greg Gianforte is what toxic Christianity looks like

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Pigs to the water: the American exorcism

“When Christians lust for Armageddon and rejoice over the evidence that all those eternally reprobate Arabs should have never been introduced to democracy, we are no longer part of the body of Christ, but the flailing limbs of a demon-possessed man in a Gerasene graveyard.” — Morgan Guyton

Morgan Guyton is the director of the NOLA Wesley Foundation, the United Methodist campus ministry at Tulane and Loyola University in New Orleans, LA.

See: Pigs to the water: the American exorcism

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Franklin Graham Continues To Be The Worst Thing To Happen To God In A While

“Franklin Graham appears intent on making Christianity more unappealing than a Pauly Shore comeback. I’m not saying Franklin Graham isn’t a Christian, but I don’t find his twisted version of Christianity when I read the Gospels. He gave an interview to The Atlantic in which he sang from his now tired set list of self-indulgent grievances, blissfully unburdened by any debt to the truth. It’s clear that about the only people not offended by Donald Trump are white evangelicals—enabled and incited by religious charlatans like Franklin Graham.” — Derek Penwell

See: Franklin Graham Continues To Be The Worst Thing To Happen To God In A While

Derek Penwell is an author, editor, speaker, and activist. He is the senior minister of Douglass Boulevard Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Louisville, Kentucky and a former lecturer at the University of Louisville in Religious Studies and Humanities. Follow him on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/reseudaimon

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Denial that assault wouldn’t happen on Baylor University’s campus is naive and foolish

“There’s a nickname we have for Baylor University, the private Baptist university in Waco, Texas: the “Baylor Bubble.” Everything inside the bubble is safe and everything outside—the general population and environs of Waco—is not. The “Baylor Bubble” is, of course, a lie. Baylor University is no more or less safe than any other university, Christian or otherwise. In fact, an argument could be made that it is actually less safe than some secular universities. Everything comes back to the belief that things like rape, alcohol abuse and violence don’t happen here. This head-in-the-sand approach and flat denial that assault wouldn’t happen on Baylor’s campus is utterly naive and foolish.” — Kate Morrison

See: How the ‘Baylor Bubble’ explains the college’s rape scandal

Kate Morrison is a sportswriter based in Texas. She graduated from Baylor University in 2013.

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Religious left, moderates and secularists would create strong coalition

“If you can create a coalition that includes the religious left but also those moderates in the middle and also secularists, then you would have an incredibly strong coalition.” — Marie Griffith

Marie Griffith is the director of the John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics at Washington University in St. Louis.

See: High Noon for the Religious Left

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‘Religious left’ emerging as U.S. political force in Trump era

“It’s one of the dirty little secrets of American politics that there has been a religious left all along and it just hasn’t done a good job of organizing. It has taken a crisis, or perceived crisis, like Trump’s election to cause folks on the religious left to really own their religion in the public square.” — J. Patrick Hornbeck II

J. Patrick Hornbeck II is chairman of the theology department at Fordham University, a Jesuit school in New York.

See: ‘Religious left’ emerging as U.S. political force in Trump era

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The Christian intellectual tradition is alive and well

“Whether inside or outside of church communities, the continued strength of religious publishing and the internet’s radical democratization of information offer broad access to a range of Christian thinkers who are intellectuals, if not scholars.” — Jacob Lupfer

Jacob Lupfer is a frequent commentator on religion in American politics and culture. Lupfer has worked in parish ministry and has taught at the middle school, high school, community college, and university levels. Follow him on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/jlupf

See: The Christian intellectual tradition is alive and well

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Retreating with those who share our bias is dangerous

“In a world where the powers thrive via a divide-and-conquer strategy, nothing could be more dangerous than circling our wagons and retreating with those who share our bias about the world (be it “liberal” or “conservative”).” — Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove

See: Taking the Benedict Option? A Conversation Between Rod Dreher & Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove

Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove is a Christian writer and preacher who has graduated both from Eastern University and Duke Divinity School. He associates himself with New Monasticism. Follow him on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/wilsonhartgrove

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The culture war over religious morality has faded

“As Americans have left organized religion, they haven’t stopped viewing politics as a struggle between “us” and “them.” Many have come to define us and them in even more primal and irreconcilable ways.” — Peter Beinart

See: Breaking Faith: The culture war over religious morality has faded; in its place is something much worse.

Peter Beinart is a contributing editor at The Atlantic and an associate professor of journalism and political science at the City University of New York.

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Democrats, like Republicans, have no interest in genuine reform

“No movement or political revolution will ever be built within the confines of the Democratic Party. And the repeated failure of the American left to grasp the duplicitous game being played by the political elites has effectively neutered it as a political force. The Democrats, like the Republicans, have no interest in genuine reform. They are wedded to corporate power.” — Chris Hedges

Christopher Lynn Hedges is an American Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, professor at Princeton University, author of several New York Times best-sellers, and Presbyterian minister. See: Bernie Sanders’ Phantom Movement

Follow him on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/chrislynnhedges

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Evangelical movement has forfeited moral authority

“The evangelical movement has, in my view, forfeited any future moral authority in American public life.” — Mark DeMoss

Mark DeMoss, a public relations executive with strong ties to the American evangelical community, resigned in the wake of disagreement with other executive committee members over his public criticism of President Jerry Falwell Jr.’s personal endorsement of Donald Trump. He had had been the chairman of the executive committee of Liberty University’s Board of Trustees. Liberty University is a private, non-profit Christian university affiliated with the Southern Baptist Conservatives of Virginia and located in Lynchburg, Virginia. DeMoss also served as a senior advisor for Mitt Romney’s 2008 and 2012 presidential campaigns.

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