Why evangelicals should rethink the Trump gospel

The choice is stark, unsettling and serious: between what Christians call the “Great Commission” and President’s Trump’s call to “Make America Great Again” (MAGA). The Great Commission is racially and radically inclusive, while MAGA, as a matter of rhetoric and reality, is racially exclusive and divisive. Jesus praised a foreigner, an ethnic outcast, and religiously unpopular “good Samaritan” as an example of great compassion.—Cornell Brooks

Source: Why evangelicals should rethink the Trump gospel (opinion) – CNN

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All people are capable of many good and beautiful things

The religious right understand themselves to be in an epic battle against what they call “humanism,” that liberals have too positive a view of human nature. I don’t think the Bible requires us to adopt a nihilistic, anti-humanist view of human nature. Sin is very real and very imprisoning to humanity. And yet, people are capable of many good and beautiful things, even people who have never “accepted Jesus as their personal Lord and savior.” — Morgan Guyton

Morgan Guyton is director of the NOLA Wesley Foundation, which is the United Methodist campus ministry at Tulane and Loyola University in New Orleans, LA. He is also a United Methodist pastor, blogger, and author of dozens of articles featured in Red Letter Christians, Huffington Post Religion, Think Christian, Ministry Matters, and others.

Source: If Donald Trump wins, I will blame toxic Christianity and here’s why

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Nominal Christians are becoming more secular, and that’s creating a startling change for the U.S.

America is undergoing a religious polarization. Today’s America is losing much of the general religious ethos that dominated the U.S. for hundreds of years. Historically, Christians have survived — and thrived — as a passionate and convictional minority. In the first century, Christians didn’t gain influence by protesting the Roman government’s “War on Christmas.” They faithfully followed Christ, at times in the face of persecution, while rescuing discarded infants, comforting the sick left to die alone and sharing the gospel to a not-always-receptive world. Our mission [is] not to moralize the unconverted, but to reach the broken and hurting.

Source: Nominal Christians are becoming more secular, and that’s creating a startling change for the U.S. – The Washington Post

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If you didn’t like the Christian right, you’ll really hate the post-Christian right

“The religious leaders who most readily endorsed Trump were representatives of two of the Christian ‘heresies’ overtaking traditional Christianity in America: the Prosperity Gospel and the religion of American nationalism. All over Europe, and increasingly America, we see the post-Christian right turning into a nationalist, or even ethno-nationalist, movement. A secularized America is going to have a much more extreme right wing, but also a much more extreme left wing, and fewer ways for them to interact and talk.” — Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry

Source: If you didn’t like the Christian right, you’ll really hate the post-Christian right

Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry is a writer and fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center. He writes about religion, culture, politics, economics, business and technology. Follow him on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/pegobry.

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Alt-Right white supremacist ideologies are anti-Christ and satanic to the core

The so-called Alt-Right white supremacist ideologies are anti-Christ and satanic to the core. We should say so.” — Russell D. Moore

Russell D. Moore is an American evangelical theologian, ethicist, and preacher. He is currently president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission, the public-policy arm of the Southern Baptist Convention.

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A Powerful Religious Left is Emerging, But They’ll Fail Without Secular Support

“Atheists and religious progressives have far more in common than either group does with the Christian Right.” — Hemant Mehta

Source: A Powerful Religious Left is Emerging, But They’ll Fail Without Secular Support

Hemant Mehta is the editor of Friendly Atheist, appears on the Atheist Voice channel on YouTube, and co-hosts the uniquely-named Friendly Atheist Podcast.

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“Legislating morality” was not a platform for Jesus or the apostles

“The far right of the evangelical movement in the United States has a highly organized campaign to impose biblical law on every aspect of American society. As the church becomes more aggressive and militant in its political cause, this may precipitate a seizing of religious freedom. Jesus had very little to say about the political power of His day. “Legislating morality” was not a platform for Jesus or the apostles in their ministry in the good news of Christ.” — Paul Vieira

See: Jesus Has Left the Building

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Franklin Graham Continues To Be The Worst Thing To Happen To God In A While

“Franklin Graham appears intent on making Christianity more unappealing than a Pauly Shore comeback. I’m not saying Franklin Graham isn’t a Christian, but I don’t find his twisted version of Christianity when I read the Gospels. He gave an interview to The Atlantic in which he sang from his now tired set list of self-indulgent grievances, blissfully unburdened by any debt to the truth. It’s clear that about the only people not offended by Donald Trump are white evangelicals—enabled and incited by religious charlatans like Franklin Graham.” — Derek Penwell

See: Franklin Graham Continues To Be The Worst Thing To Happen To God In A While

Derek Penwell is an author, editor, speaker, and activist. He is the senior minister of Douglass Boulevard Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Louisville, Kentucky and a former lecturer at the University of Louisville in Religious Studies and Humanities. Follow him on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/reseudaimon

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Many faith leaders join the March for Science

“We think both religion and science teach humility, and that we are part of something larger. We believe we have a moral obligation to take care of the Earth and to care for each other. And science can help service that.” — Rev. Brian Sauder

See: Faith groups backing march see an ally in science

Brian Sauder grew up in a deeply religious Anabaptist community in rural Illinois. Now a minister in Chicago, Sauder is just one of many faith leaders who are planning to join the March for Science, and see little conflict between faith and science. He is the executive director of a Chicago-based nonprofit called Faith in Place, which works with faith communities across Illinois to promote environmental justice and sustainability. Follow him on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/briansauder

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Commitment to inclusion has muzzled liberal Protestants

“What has muzzled liberal Protestants is their own commitment to inclusion and opposition to discrimination. Their aim is to serve society as a whole, rather than their own narrow confessional self-interest. The problem is not that they lack conviction, but that their convictions make it intensely difficult for them to assert their faith.” — Alec Ryrie

See: The weakness of the religious left: How progressive evangelicals ceded moral authority to the right wing: Liberal Protestants could be a politically powerful force in America, if they allowed themselves to be

Alec Ryrie is the author of “Protestants: The Faith That Made the Modern World”. He is professor of the history of Christianity at Durham University in England and a licensed minister in his local church.

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Most right-wing fundamentalists want government to enforce exclusionary dogma

“The goal of most right-wing fundamentalist Christians is not and never will be disengagement; it is to meddle in the lives of others and use the government as an instrument to enforce their narrow, exclusionary dogma.” — Rob Boston

See: It’s Time For The Religious Right To Embrace The ‘Mind-Your-Own-Business’ Option

Robert Boston is Director of Communications for Americans United for Separation of Church and State and Editor of Church & State magazine. Americans United for Separation of Church and State was founded in 1947 by a broad coalition of religious, educational and civic leaders.

Follow him on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/robboston1

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Religious left, moderates and secularists would create strong coalition

“If you can create a coalition that includes the religious left but also those moderates in the middle and also secularists, then you would have an incredibly strong coalition.” — Marie Griffith

Marie Griffith is the director of the John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics at Washington University in St. Louis.

See: High Noon for the Religious Left

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‘Religious left’ emerging as U.S. political force in Trump era

“It’s one of the dirty little secrets of American politics that there has been a religious left all along and it just hasn’t done a good job of organizing. It has taken a crisis, or perceived crisis, like Trump’s election to cause folks on the religious left to really own their religion in the public square.” — J. Patrick Hornbeck II

J. Patrick Hornbeck II is chairman of the theology department at Fordham University, a Jesuit school in New York.

See: ‘Religious left’ emerging as U.S. political force in Trump era

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The Christian intellectual tradition is alive and well

“Whether inside or outside of church communities, the continued strength of religious publishing and the internet’s radical democratization of information offer broad access to a range of Christian thinkers who are intellectuals, if not scholars.” — Jacob Lupfer

Jacob Lupfer is a frequent commentator on religion in American politics and culture. Lupfer has worked in parish ministry and has taught at the middle school, high school, community college, and university levels. Follow him on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/jlupf

See: The Christian intellectual tradition is alive and well

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Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission defends Russell Moore

“Dr. Moore is the man to whom it has been entrusted to lead this entity—speaking prophetically both to our culture and to our Convention.” — The Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission Executive Committee

See: Seeking unity in the Southern Baptist Convention

Russell D. Moore is an American evangelical theologian, ethicist, and preacher. He is currently president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission, the public-policy arm of the Southern Baptist Convention.

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Religious right embraces its roots in racism

“The overwhelming support for Trump heralds the religious right coming full circle to embrace its roots in racism.” — Randall Balmer

See: Amazing Disgrace: How did Donald Trump—a thrice-married, biblically illiterate sexual predator—hijack the religious right?

Randall Balmer is the John Phillips Professor in Religion and director of the Society of Fellows at Dartmouth College.

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The culture war over religious morality has faded

“As Americans have left organized religion, they haven’t stopped viewing politics as a struggle between “us” and “them.” Many have come to define us and them in even more primal and irreconcilable ways.” — Peter Beinart

See: Breaking Faith: The culture war over religious morality has faded; in its place is something much worse.

Peter Beinart is a contributing editor at The Atlantic and an associate professor of journalism and political science at the City University of New York.

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