Conservative Gen-Xers simply don’t trust the right-wing religious establishment any more

We’re tired of the way so many Boomers seemed to bully through culture with very little regard for what was before or after them. For people of my generation and younger, we simply don’t trust the right-wing religious establishment any more. We saw one disaster after another emerge from the conservative religious right. Over time, moral duplicity began to define right-wing fervor for many of us. When we see someone crusading hard for legislated morality, red flags go up instinctively. It’s not that Gen-Xers are ungracious with sin. We know that everyone needs grace, and we are willing to extend that to the broken. But Boomer Conservatives tend to appeal to moral superiority when they ask for our political allegiance. This appeal means little to Gen-Xers. Some of the most disturbing, perverse, abusive stories we have heard have come from the religious right. When Jerry Fallwell Jr. tries to convince us that Trump is a good man, that spooks us. If a right-wing politician commits a foul deed, it seems like conservative leaders tend [to] minimize that fault while nailing a left-winger for the same exact wrong done. When we say that we are tired of the religious right, we are talking about a political movement that has adopted religious robes to promote its own causes. X-ers shoot straight, see. That’s how we roll.

Source: 7 Requests from a Right-Wing Gen-Xer: Why Boomers are Having Trouble Convincing X-ers to Vote for Trump — Rebecca K. Reynolds

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Trump has cured what used to be called “the Moral Majority” of its moralism.

A belief in the connection between personal morality and fitness for office used to be a bedrock of Republican politics. Donald Trump has changed all that. Today, white evangelical Protestants are the least moralistic cohort of voters. Trump has cured what used to be called “the Moral Majority” of its moralism.

Source: Religious Right Now Judgment-Free, Thanks to Donald Trump

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All people are capable of many good and beautiful things

The religious right understand themselves to be in an epic battle against what they call “humanism,” that liberals have too positive a view of human nature. I don’t think the Bible requires us to adopt a nihilistic, anti-humanist view of human nature. Sin is very real and very imprisoning to humanity. And yet, people are capable of many good and beautiful things, even people who have never “accepted Jesus as their personal Lord and savior.” — Morgan Guyton

Morgan Guyton is director of the NOLA Wesley Foundation, which is the United Methodist campus ministry at Tulane and Loyola University in New Orleans, LA. He is also a United Methodist pastor, blogger, and author of dozens of articles featured in Red Letter Christians, Huffington Post Religion, Think Christian, Ministry Matters, and others.

Source: If Donald Trump wins, I will blame toxic Christianity and here’s why

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Most right-wing fundamentalists want government to enforce exclusionary dogma

“The goal of most right-wing fundamentalist Christians is not and never will be disengagement; it is to meddle in the lives of others and use the government as an instrument to enforce their narrow, exclusionary dogma.” — Rob Boston

See: It’s Time For The Religious Right To Embrace The ‘Mind-Your-Own-Business’ Option

Robert Boston is Director of Communications for Americans United for Separation of Church and State and Editor of Church & State magazine. Americans United for Separation of Church and State was founded in 1947 by a broad coalition of religious, educational and civic leaders.

Follow him on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/robboston1

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Religious right embraces its roots in racism

“The overwhelming support for Trump heralds the religious right coming full circle to embrace its roots in racism.” — Randall Balmer

See: Amazing Disgrace: How did Donald Trump—a thrice-married, biblically illiterate sexual predator—hijack the religious right?

Randall Balmer is the John Phillips Professor in Religion and director of the Society of Fellows at Dartmouth College.

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Unholy alliance of Political Right and Religious Right

“The unholy alliance of the Political Right and the Religious Right threatens to destroy the America we love. It also threatens to generate a revulsion against God and religion by identifying them with militarism, ecological irresponsibility, fundamentalist antagonism to science and rational thought, and insensitivity to the needs of the poor and the powerless.” — Rabbi Michael Lerner

The Left Hand of God: Taking Back Our Country from the Religious Right is a 2006 book by Rabbi Michael Lerner. Rabbi Michael Lerner is an American political activist and the editor of Tikkun, a progressive Jewish interfaith magazine.

Follow him on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/rabbilerner

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American Evangelicalism enmeshed with religious right

“American Evangelicalism is enmeshed with the religious right psychologically, institutionally, and in terms of reputation in ways the Catholic bishops, the Mormon apostles, and Orthodox rabbis just aren’t.” – Russell Moore

See: Can the Religious Right be Saved?

Russell D. Moore is an American evangelical theologian, ethicist, and preacher. He is currently president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission, the public-policy arm of the Southern Baptist Convention.

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When Christianity is seen as a political project

“When Christianity is seen as a political project in search of a gospel useful enough to advance its worldly agenda, it will end up pleasing those who make politics primary, while losing those who believe the Gospel.” – Russell Moore

See: Can the Religious Right be Saved?

Russell D. Moore is an American evangelical theologian, ethicist, and preacher. He is currently president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission, the public-policy arm of the Southern Baptist Convention.

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