Neither Trump’s vitriol nor the corporate liberals and multicultural elite challenges the exploitation and oppression of immigrants and migrant workers

It is absolutely vital to denounce the brutal legacy of colonialist plunder that set the capitalist system in motion over 500 years ago. Neither Trump’s explicitly racist vitriol nor the paternalistic “pro-immigrant” discourse of corporate liberals and the multicultural elite challenges the structures allowing for the exploitation and oppression of immigrants and migrant workers. [Capitalists’] ability to earn a profit is literally dependent on an endless supply of highly racialized and deportable bodies. A structural crisis of the global capitalist system reduces human beings to the commodities they either produce, consume, or — in the case of their labor power — are forced to sell. The systematic repression of racialized surplus populations is clearly an attempt to keep a lid on growing discontent among the most socially marginalized, who come to serve as scapegoats for the system’s growing instability. Moral pleas and strident denunciations of xenophobia and hate that are not simultaneously buttressed by an anti-capitalist critique practically invite co-optation by the multicultural corporate elite.

Source: Why Corporate Democrats Do Not Support Immigrant Justice | Alternet

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Moral character DOES matter: Focus on the Selling Out of James Dobson

What has alarmed me has been the willingness of my fellow citizens to rationalize the President’s behavior. Yes, the rules have changed for the President. Character DOES matter. You can’t run a family, let alone a country, without it. How in the world can 7 out of 10 Americans continue to say that nothing matters except a robust economy? – James Dobson, founder of Focus on the Family, on the character of the President of the United States (1998)

Source: What James Dobson Said in 1998 About Moral Character and the Presidency | the way of improvement leads home

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2018 will be a year where interfaith work will protect the most vulnerable

2018 will be a year where interfaith work will be about recalibrating our nation’s moral and ethical social agenda. 2018 will be the year that churches, mosques, temples, synagogues, Gurdwaras and sacred spaces will work together to protect the most vulnerable. I see more people of faith coming together motivated to heal the divides and ugliness not just in their societies, but in their neighborhoods.

Source: What’s next for religion in 2018? | National Catholic Reporter

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A Morality that Looks Like Jesus

“Thousands of grassroots movements are emerging across the country, all focused on turning our national soul to a morality that looks like the heart of Jesus. Somebody’s hurting our brother, somebody’s hurting our sister, somebody’s hurting our children, and we won’t–we can’t–be silent anymore.”

Source: 7 Highlights of a Morality that Looks Like Jesus – Red Letter Christians

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Many faith leaders join the March for Science

“We think both religion and science teach humility, and that we are part of something larger. We believe we have a moral obligation to take care of the Earth and to care for each other. And science can help service that.” — Rev. Brian Sauder

See: Faith groups backing march see an ally in science

Brian Sauder grew up in a deeply religious Anabaptist community in rural Illinois. Now a minister in Chicago, Sauder is just one of many faith leaders who are planning to join the March for Science, and see little conflict between faith and science. He is the executive director of a Chicago-based nonprofit called Faith in Place, which works with faith communities across Illinois to promote environmental justice and sustainability. Follow him on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/briansauder

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Commitment to inclusion has muzzled liberal Protestants

“What has muzzled liberal Protestants is their own commitment to inclusion and opposition to discrimination. Their aim is to serve society as a whole, rather than their own narrow confessional self-interest. The problem is not that they lack conviction, but that their convictions make it intensely difficult for them to assert their faith.” — Alec Ryrie

See: The weakness of the religious left: How progressive evangelicals ceded moral authority to the right wing: Liberal Protestants could be a politically powerful force in America, if they allowed themselves to be

Alec Ryrie is the author of “Protestants: The Faith That Made the Modern World”. He is professor of the history of Christianity at Durham University in England and a licensed minister in his local church.

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The Lord’s Prayer is radical and revolutionary

“The Lord’s Prayer is radical and revolutionary. When we pray that God’s kingdom will be made real here on earth, we’re praying for a kingdom where the poor, the refugee, the sick, and the broken have the best seat at the banquet. Building that kingdom requires prayer, activism, solidarity, and moral resistance that are politically engaged but which ultimately transcend the politics of the day.” — John Gehring

John Gehring is the Catholic Program Director of Faith in Public Life, author or The Francis Effect and contributing editor of Commonweal Magazine, an independent journal of religion, politics and culture edited by lay Catholics. Follow him on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/gehringdc

See: Prophetic Prayer & Moral Resistance: The Role of the Faithful in the Trump Era

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Rev. Franklin Graham and Jerry Falwell Jr. making an idol of access to power

“Religious apologists for Trump such as Rev. Franklin Graham and Jerry Falwell Jr. continue to disgrace themselves by making an idol of access to power.” — John Gehring

John Gehring is the Catholic Program Director of Faith in Public Life, author or The Francis Effect and contributing editor of Commonweal Magazine, an independent journal of religion, politics and culture edited by lay Catholics. Follow him on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/gehringdc

See: Prophetic Prayer & Moral Resistance: The Role of the Faithful in the Trump Era

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Over 100 faith leaders send letter opposing Trump’s budget plan

“Matthew 25 tells us when we serve the least of these, we are serving the Lord. As people of faith, we cannot turn our back on those in desperate need. It is our moral responsibility to urge you to support and protect the International Affairs Budget.”

See: 106 Faith Leaders Sign Letter to Congressional Leadership Supporting U.S. International Affairs Budget

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The culture war over religious morality has faded

“As Americans have left organized religion, they haven’t stopped viewing politics as a struggle between “us” and “them.” Many have come to define us and them in even more primal and irreconcilable ways.” — Peter Beinart

See: Breaking Faith: The culture war over religious morality has faded; in its place is something much worse.

Peter Beinart is a contributing editor at The Atlantic and an associate professor of journalism and political science at the City University of New York.

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Evangelical movement has forfeited moral authority

“The evangelical movement has, in my view, forfeited any future moral authority in American public life.” — Mark DeMoss

Mark DeMoss, a public relations executive with strong ties to the American evangelical community, resigned in the wake of disagreement with other executive committee members over his public criticism of President Jerry Falwell Jr.’s personal endorsement of Donald Trump. He had had been the chairman of the executive committee of Liberty University’s Board of Trustees. Liberty University is a private, non-profit Christian university affiliated with the Southern Baptist Conservatives of Virginia and located in Lynchburg, Virginia. DeMoss also served as a senior advisor for Mitt Romney’s 2008 and 2012 presidential campaigns.

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